Verifying RPC Network Connectivity Like A Boss

Aloha.  I did some fun Powershelling yesterday and now it's time to share.

If you work in an IT environment that's of any significant size, chances are you have firewalls.  Maybe lots and lots of firewalls. RPC can be a particularly difficult network protocol to work with when it comes to making sure all the ports necessary for its operation are open on your firewalls. I've found that firewall guys sometimes have a hard time allowing the application guy's RPC traffic through their firewalls because of its dynamic nature. Sometimes the application guys don't really know how RPC works, so they don't really know what to ask of the firewall guys.  And to make it even worse, RPC errors can be hard to diagnose.  For instance, the classic RPC error 1722 (0x6BA) - "The RPC server is unavailable" sounds like a network problem at first, but can actually mean access denied, or DNS resolution failure, etc.

MSRPC, or Microsoft Remote Procedure Call, is Microsoft's implementation of DCE (Distributed Computing Environment) RPC. It's been around a long time and is pervasive in an environment containing Windows computers. Tons of Windows applications and components depend on it.

A very brief summary of how the protocol works: There is an "endpoint mapper" that runs on TCP port 135. You can bind to that port on a remote computer anonymously and enumerate all the various RPC services available on that computer.  The services may be using named pipes or TCP/IP.  Named pipes will use port 445.  The services that are using TCP are each dynamically allocated their own TCP ports, which are drawn from a pool of port numbers. This pool of port numbers is by default 1024-5000 on XP/2003 and below, and 49152-65535 on Vista/2008 and above. (The ephemeral port range.) You can customize that port range that RPC will use if you wish, like so:

reg add HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Rpc\Internet /v Ports /t REG_MULTI_SZ /f /d 8000-9000
reg add HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Rpc\Internet /v PortsInternetAvailable /t REG_SZ /f /d Y
reg add HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Rpc\Internet /v UseInternetPorts /t REG_SZ /f /d Y

And/Or

netsh int ipv4 set dynamicport tcp start=8000 num=1001
netsh int ipv4 set dynamicport udp start=8000 num=1001
netsh int ipv6 set dynamicport tcp start=8000 num=1001
netsh int ipv6 set dynamicport udp start=8000 num=1001

This is why we have to query the endpoint mapper first, because we can't just guess exactly which port we need to connect to for a particular service.

So, I wrote a little something in Powershell that will test the network connectivity of a remote machine for RPC, by querying the endpoint mapper, and then querying each port that the endpoint mapper tells me that it's currently using.


#Requires -Version 3
Function Test-RPC
{
    [CmdletBinding(SupportsShouldProcess=$True)]
    Param([Parameter(ValueFromPipeline=$True)][String[]]$ComputerName = 'localhost')
    BEGIN
    {
        Set-StrictMode -Version Latest
        $PInvokeCode = @'
        using System;
        using System.Collections.Generic;
        using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

        public class Rpc
        {
            // I found this crud in RpcDce.h

            [DllImport("Rpcrt4.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
            public static extern int RpcBindingFromStringBinding(string StringBinding, out IntPtr Binding);

            [DllImport("Rpcrt4.dll")]
            public static extern int RpcBindingFree(ref IntPtr Binding);

            [DllImport("Rpcrt4.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
            public static extern int RpcMgmtEpEltInqBegin(IntPtr EpBinding,
                                                    int InquiryType, // 0x00000000 = RPC_C_EP_ALL_ELTS
                                                    int IfId,
                                                    int VersOption,
                                                    string ObjectUuid,
                                                    out IntPtr InquiryContext);

            [DllImport("Rpcrt4.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
            public static extern int RpcMgmtEpEltInqNext(IntPtr InquiryContext,
                                                    out RPC_IF_ID IfId,
                                                    out IntPtr Binding,
                                                    out Guid ObjectUuid,
                                                    out IntPtr Annotation);

            [DllImport("Rpcrt4.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
            public static extern int RpcBindingToStringBinding(IntPtr Binding, out IntPtr StringBinding);

            public struct RPC_IF_ID
            {
                public Guid Uuid;
                public ushort VersMajor;
                public ushort VersMinor;
            }

            public static List QueryEPM(string host)
            {
                List ports = new List();
                int retCode = 0; // RPC_S_OK                
                IntPtr bindingHandle = IntPtr.Zero;
                IntPtr inquiryContext = IntPtr.Zero;                
                IntPtr elementBindingHandle = IntPtr.Zero;
                RPC_IF_ID elementIfId;
                Guid elementUuid;
                IntPtr elementAnnotation;

                try
                {                    
                    retCode = RpcBindingFromStringBinding("ncacn_ip_tcp:" + host, out bindingHandle);
                    if (retCode != 0)
                        throw new Exception("RpcBindingFromStringBinding: " + retCode);

                    retCode = RpcMgmtEpEltInqBegin(bindingHandle, 0, 0, 0, string.Empty, out inquiryContext);
                    if (retCode != 0)
                        throw new Exception("RpcMgmtEpEltInqBegin: " + retCode);
                    
                    do
                    {
                        IntPtr bindString = IntPtr.Zero;
                        retCode = RpcMgmtEpEltInqNext (inquiryContext, out elementIfId, out elementBindingHandle, out elementUuid, out elementAnnotation);
                        if (retCode != 0)
                            if (retCode == 1772)
                                break;

                        retCode = RpcBindingToStringBinding(elementBindingHandle, out bindString);
                        if (retCode != 0)
                            throw new Exception("RpcBindingToStringBinding: " + retCode);
                            
                        string s = Marshal.PtrToStringAuto(bindString).Trim().ToLower();
                        if(s.StartsWith("ncacn_ip_tcp:"))                        
                            ports.Add(int.Parse(s.Split('[')[1].Split(']')[0]));
                        
                        RpcBindingFree(ref elementBindingHandle);
                        
                    }
                    while (retCode != 1772); // RPC_X_NO_MORE_ENTRIES

                }
                catch(Exception ex)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(ex);
                    return ports;
                }
                finally
                {
                    RpcBindingFree(ref bindingHandle);
                }
                
                return ports;
            }
        }
'@
    }
    PROCESS
    {
        ForEach($Computer In $ComputerName)
        {
            If($PSCmdlet.ShouldProcess($Computer))
            {
                [Bool]$EPMOpen = $False
                $Socket = New-Object Net.Sockets.TcpClient
                
                Try
                {                    
                    $Socket.Connect($Computer, 135)
                    If ($Socket.Connected)
                    {
                        $EPMOpen = $True
                    }
                    $Socket.Close()                    
                }
                Catch
                {
                    $Socket.Dispose()
                }
                
                If ($EPMOpen)
                {
                    Add-Type $PInvokeCode
                    $RPCPorts = [Rpc]::QueryEPM($Computer)
                    [Bool]$AllPortsOpen = $True
                    Foreach ($Port In $RPCPorts)
                    {
                        $Socket = New-Object Net.Sockets.TcpClient
                        Try
                        {
                            $Socket.Connect($Computer, $Port)
                            If (!$Socket.Connected)
                            {
                                $AllPortsOpen = $False
                            }
                            $Socket.Close()
                        }
                        Catch
                        {
                            $AllPortsOpen = $False
                            $Socket.Dispose()
                        }
                    }

                    [PSObject]@{'ComputerName' = $Computer; 'EndPointMapperOpen' = $EPMOpen; 'RPCPortsInUse' = $RPCPorts; 'AllRPCPortsOpen' = $AllPortsOpen}
                }
                Else
                {
                    [PSObject]@{'ComputerName' = $Computer; 'EndPointMapperOpen' = $EPMOpen}
                }
            }
        }
    }
    END
    {

    }
}

And the output will look a little something like this:


You can also query the endpoint mapper with PortQry.exe -n server01 -e 135, but I was curious about how it worked at a deeper level, so I ended up writing something myself. There weren't many examples of how to use that particular native API, so it was pretty tough.

Redirecting HTTP to HTTPS with the IIS URL Rewrite Module

I should use TLS

Hi folks. I've been working on my HTTP web server the past couple of weeks. It's pretty good so far. It uses the managed thread pool, does asynchronous request handling, tokenization (like %CURRENTDATE%, etc.) server-side includes, SSL/TLS support, can run multiple websites simultaneously, etc. It seems really fast, but I haven't put it through any serious load tests yet.  My original goal was to use it to completely replace this blog and content management system (IIS and BlogEngine.NET,) but now I'm starting to think that won't happen. Mainly because I would need to convert years worth of content to a new format, and I would want to preserve the URLs so that if anyone on the internet had ever linked to any of my blog posts, they wouldn't all turn to 404s when I made the switch. That's actually more daunting to me than writing a server and a CMS.



So I'm taking a break from that and instead improving what I've already got here. One thing I've always wanted to do but never got around to was redirecting HTTP to HTTPS. We should be using SSL/TLS to encrypt our web traffic whenever possible. Especially when it's this simple:

First, open IIS Manager, and use Web Platform Installer to install the URL Rewrite 2.0 module:

Install URL Rewrite


Now at the server level, open URL Rewrite and add a new blank rule:

Add Blank Rule


Next you want to match (.*) regex pattern:

Edit the rule


And finally add the following condition:


Condition


And that's all there is to it!  This is of course assuming that you've got an SSL certificate bound to the website already, and that you're listening on both ports 80 and 443.

Note that you can also do this exact same thing by editing your web.config file by hand:


    
<system.WebServer>
   ...
   <rewrite>
      <globalrules>
        <rule name="Redirect to HTTPS" stopprocessing="true" enabled="true">
          <match url="(.*)"></match>
          <action type="Redirect" url="https://{HTTP_HOST}/{R:1}"></action>
          <conditions>
            <add pattern="^OFF$" input="{HTTPS}"></add>
          </conditions>
        </rule>
      </globalrules>
    </rewrite>
</system.WebServer>

And finally, a tip: Don't put resources such as images in your website that are sourced from HTTP, regardless if they're from your own server or someone else's. Use relative paths (or at least the https prefix) instead. Web browsers typically complain or even refuse to load "insecure" content on a secure page.