ORS - Office Rageface Sender

by Ryan 2. April 2012 22:33

freddie

If you work in an office in a corporate environment like I do, you're probably familiar with Microsoft Office Communicator, often referred to as OCS. These days they call it Lync -- but it's still most widely known as OCS. Anyway, it's an IM client that you can use to communicate with your bosses... and for them to see when you're taking a bit too long of a lunch break. The one thing it doesn't do, however, is quickly paste pictures for others to see. A picture is worth a thousand words, right? So I set out this last weekend to remedy this situation.

What I ended up with a couple days later is what I'm calling ORS - or Office Rageface Sender. A coworker of mine is very fond of those ragefaces that seem to be all the... rage... lately, but it's difficult to make those jokes without actually being able to show the relevant picture to go with it. 

Currently, ORS is a network application, but only works within your current subnet, because it uses UDP broadcasts as a "discovery" mechanism to discover peers on the network (i.e. other people also running ORS) to populate your contact list. In addition, TCP port 9068 is used for direct communication. 

Upon launching ORS for the first time, you will be asked for your nickname. You can change it at any time by clicking the status bar at the bottom of the main window. Your nickname will be saved in the registry so it won’t ask you every time you launch the app. The effects of duplicate nicknames on the network hasn’t been thoroughly explored, (hey I’m only one guy) but they should be minimal as communications are typically IP-based. 

Also when you launch ORS for the first time, it will create an Images folder at the same location where the executable is running. Dump all your favorite images here. Optimally, they should be as close to 512x512 as possible, as they will be displayed in a 512x512 window. However, images larger than that will be automatically scaled down to fit. Images smaller than that will be centered (not stretched.) 

When you right-click on a person’s name in the main window, a context menu will pop up which contains a list of all the images currently in your Images directory. This list and context menu is dynamic, so you don’t need to relaunch the app every time you modify the contents of your images directory. By clicking an image name over a contact, that image will be displayed on their screen in real-time. 

If the recipient does not currently have the image that you are trying to send them, you will automatically send it to them over TCP, it will be saved to their own Images directory, and then displayed normally. If they already have the same image (as determined by name,) that local image will be displayed. If two users have the same filename in their images directory but are actually different pictures, then the recipient will see a different image than the one you intended. 

The application minimizes to the system tray. You can right-click the icon to exit the app, or just close the form. 

If you’d like to give this a try when you’re in the same broadcast domain with one or two other people, you can download the program at the very end of this post. I very much welcome bug reports, feature requests, etc. You probably don't want to run this with a bunch of people you don't trust, as it would be possible for them to flash pictures of boobs on your screen if they wanted to.

ors

Finally, here are some stats on how much broadcast traffic each client sends, just to prove how nominal it is. About 1 packet every 10 seconds. 

Avg packets/sec 0.128
Avg packet size 75 bytes
Avg bytes/sec   9.587

ORS.exe (93.00 kb)

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About Me

Name: Ryan Ries
Location: Texas, USA
Occupation: Systems Engineer 

I am a Windows engineer and Microsoft advocate, but I can run with pretty much any system that uses electricity.  I'm all about getting closer to the cutting edge of technology while using the right tool for the job.

This blog is about exploring IT and documenting the journey.


Blog Posts (or Vids) You Must Read (or See):

Pushing the Limits of Windows by Mark Russinovich
Mysteries of Windows Memory Management by Mark Russinovich
Accelerating Your IT Career by Ned Pyle
Post-Graduate AD Studies by Ned Pyle
MCM: Active Directory Series by PFE Platforms Team
Encodings And Character Sets by David C. Zentgraf
Active Directory Maximum Limits by Microsoft
How Kerberos Works in AD by Microsoft
How Active Directory Replication Topology Works by Microsoft
Hardcore Debugging by Andrew Richards
The NIST Definition of Cloud by NIST


MCITP: Enterprise Administrator

VCP5-DCV

Profile for Ryan Ries at Server Fault, Q&A for system administrators

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GitHub: github.com/ryanries

 

I do not discuss my employers on this blog and all opinions expressed are mine and do not reflect the opinions of my employers.